One Simple Secret of Success

•May 9, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

The secret to success in the music business? Work at it. Every day. Practice, write, network, repeat. Every day.

Read on.

Originally posted on Make Your Music Business:

simple Every feel like there’s no traction? Like your client growth, your services, and your music business as a whole just isn’t getting anywhere?

You start things, but life happens and you just never get this music career flowing?

I believe there is one answer to this: there’s a problem with your consistency.

Now, for bakers, consistency is a problem solved by adding more sugar or flour (I guess, I’m more of a chef than a baker). For basketball players, consistency means hitting shots at a good percentage and practicing strong fundamentals every practice and game.

But for you, it’s really a bit easier…or harder. You just have to DO your thing, every day, every week, and every month.

I truly believe some music business people succeed over others because they simply do it more. They wake up every day, even when they don’t feel like it and they…

  • Work on their demo…

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10 tips to help musicians get into the industry

•May 5, 2014 • 2 Comments

Robert W. Oliver:

Print this article and read it daily. It’s the best advice about how to succeed as a musician. Perhaps numbers 3 and 10 are the most important: support your local music scene and don’t ignore your network. If you never go out to shows, don’t expect other musicians to come to yours. And if you don’t return favors or phone calls, people will assume you’re just selfish.

Oh, yeah. Listen. Listening is good.

Originally posted on My Creative Biz:

Working in the music industry can be a dream for many that is never fulfilled. Here are 10 ways an emerging musician can get into the industry.

1. Network, especially in your local industry. Go out to local gigs, follow local blogs, newsletters and street papers, listen to local radio stations. Meet as many people as you can. You never know you might meet the perfect band mate or songwriting partner.

2. Once you have a band together practice lots. Practice your instrument, your live performance and your songwriting. Organise some opportunities to perform in front of friends and ask them for real constructive criticism. You want to be as professional as you can be for your first booked show.

3. Attend local venues.  Go out and support your local venues, and make sure you go to shows by local bands, not just touring bands. Make a note of how the…

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“MUSIC PRODUCER AVAILABLE”

•April 29, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

This reminds me of more than a few Craigslist ads.

Originally posted on "My Brain Train":

“Down and almost out Producer available for recording projects producing easy to bullshit artists. If you aren’t concerned with the end result, we can still have a fun time in the studio and hanging out afterwards. Most of my connections are dead or in prison but that’s cool. We can still pretend together. I also have original songs. One is really ready to go. It’s called “You’re Not the You I Used To Know”. Call me. I am a self admitted desperado. Let’s make something nobody will ever hear.”

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A Message For Musicians Who Live In The Real World. [Editorial]

•April 28, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

You’ll be on a faster track to earn your living making music if you do two things extraordinarily well: develop your fan base and communicate with them often. People are much more likely to support you if they understand your mission.

Originally posted on TheMusicalMeltingPot:

In 2014, fifteen years after the first warning signs heralding the now legendary decline of the recorded music industry, the blame throwing and endless infighting that centres around that most black hole-like of music industry topics – online file sharing – continues.

What cannot be argued, however, is the simple fact that what happened over the last decade and a half definitely happened. Now, it is time to either find a solution to the problem of making a living as a musician in the twenty first century, or continue looking backwards, missing new opportunities, and eventually succumbing to the musty bargain bins of cultural irrelevance.

A complete solution that is universally embraced and applied  by the whole music business has yet to appear. And before we can hope to reach that point, we have to ask: Where do we start?

I would suggest that we begin by reminding ourselves of…

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Unethical Questions to ask in the music industry

•April 20, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

There is something wrong with the music industry if it considers paying its interns to be taboo. While you can’t succeed in music without passion, it is equally true that you can’t take passion dollars to the bank.

Originally posted on As You Are:

FreeLabor

A review of a panel discussion from “Envisioning 21st Century Music Business Models” event on the topic of “Ethics and the New Music Industry”.

The event took place on Thursday evening at a packed David’s Friend Recital hall at famous alma mater of musicians, Berklee College of music in Boston. The topic for discussion was primarily focused on ethical dilemmas of the industry. Experts in the field such as Marci Allen (Founder/ President, MAC presents), Melissa Ferrick, (Artist, Musician, Mpress Records), Amanda Arrillaga (director of copyright administration for RCA) and Jay Sweet (Principal/ Co-Founder, Sweet & Doggett Producer, Newport Folk Festival) shared their opinions and thoughts on most questionable matters of ethics in music business. If you are not familiar with the term and the concept of implementing ethics in music business, it’s easy to describe it as morals of the community (ex. artist management company) that makes decisions…

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21st Century Music

•April 8, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

Amanda Tessier writes that traditional radio is one of the best methods of launching a new artist. So how do you get your music on the airwaves? Cultivate and grow your fan base.

Originally posted on Amanda Tessier:

A survey was completed by a professor in a marketing class regarding the students’ media habits. Much of the data was to be expected; twenty-somethings receive a vast majority of news via the Internet or social media. Television viewing has moved online, particularly to platforms such as Hulu or Netflix. The most surprising category to me was the fragmented radio section; most people had completely abandoned traditional radio. Additionally, college students in a city are rarely driving cars–an activity they said involved more traditional radio. The fastest ways to get around Boston are by foot and by MBTA, and most travelers have earbuds on and iPhones on. Pandora, Spotify, Songza, and iTunes have taken combined control, but each one individually owns only a small portion of the audience.

The complaints about traditional radio included excessive advertising, repetition of songs, and lack of choice in music selection. All the applications mentioned solve those…

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How To Contact 4,320 New Customers

•April 8, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Robert W. Oliver:

I see no reason why this method will not keep a musician as busy as he wants to be. If you perform in the evenings, schedule calls for the mornings, with an hour in the afternoons for callbacks.

And don’t hide behind social media, expecting it to do the job for you. It’s important, but it’s no silver bullet.

Originally posted on coppellpianoshop:

I learned this sales lesson years ago when I was selling automobiles. I have since taught this to many salespeople. Try it for 21 days.

Look at the telephone on your desk. That telephone represents $100,000 in sales each year. The telephone is your friend, even though the voice on the other end will say “No” more often than “Yes.” This lesson helps you manage that important sales asset.

Before I get started, consider this: stockbrokers are just telemarketers. They make hundreds of phone calls everyday. Sales trainers in that industry teach them how to use the telephone efficiently. If you figure that the first two hours of the day are spent drinking coffee, following-up work from yesterday, and catching up on the office gossip, then don’t even worry about making telephone calls then. Stockbrokers work in blocks of time. They will assign two hour segments of time where they…

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